• Linda Healy

Breed Rescue

Purebred dogs have been showing up at shelters in increasing numbers in recent years. Alarmed that their beloved breeds are ending up there, purebred fanciers have formed breed rescue clubs to give these dogs a second chance. Volunteers who raise a particular breed open their homes and kennels to individual dogs that have ended up in a shelter or been abandoned. They also take in dogs from people who realize it isn't working out but who want to make sure their dog goes to a good home.

Once in their foster home, these dogs are evaluated for basic obedience, health, temperament and house-training. If a dog isn't quite up to speed, volunteers will often work with him until he meets the requirements to make a good pet. The last thing those groups want is for the dog to go through the cycle of abandonment all over again.

Rescue leagues are wonderful places to find a young adult purebred dog. If you find that purchase price of a purebred puppy prohibitive but have your heart set on, a particular breed then a breed rescue may be just the answer for you.

Local breeder will be able to refer you to rescue clubs, or you can access some terrific places on the internet. Try the Canine Connections Breed Rescue Information website or the Pro Dog Breed Rescue Network. Both of these sites will link you to hundreds of individual breed rescue clubs, categorized by breed.





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